Can You Guess Which Spot?

Think you’re a McMenamins history buff? Identify the five properties associated with these images.

Property #1

Property #2

Property #3

Property #4

Property #5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property #1

Highland Pub & Brewery (Gresham, OR)
This is the third of a chandelier trio, two of which hang at the Crystal Ballroom. Made sometime between 1930 and 1950, in Murano, Italy’s glass-making capital of the world, they are fine examples of the millifleury (“a thousand flowers”) style. Each chandelier weighs approximately 300 pounds and is nine feet tall.

In 1968, the Washington Mutual Bank purchased the set of three for its Seattle building. They were shipped out of Italy to the Pacific Northwest, but remained in their crates for eight years! The bank finally installed them in 1976, amidst the country’s bicentennial celebration.

When the chandeliers were removed from the bank in the early ’90s, Portland Antiques purchased all three. Mike McMenamin was awestruck when he saw them — they convey a mood of Classic Italianate culture crossed with Haight-Ashbury psychedelia, perfect for the Crystal. Two were installed in the ballroom, while the third graces the Highland Pub & Brewery.

Property #2

Roseburg Station Pub & Brewery (Roseburg, OR)
Built in 1912, this charming building was considered one of the finest passenger stations between Portland and the San Francisco Bay Area. McMenamins took over stewardship in 1999, and the renovation preserved as much of the building’s architectural character as possible. Original features such as the vaulted, 16-foot-high ceiling, tongue-and-groove fir wainscoting and marble molding were all cleaned and polished and a graceful, red tile roof (matching its original construction) was added.

Property #3

McMenamins Sherwood (Sherwood, OR)
When researching the history of this spot, I tried to find a logical frog connection – this motif hops up quite a bit in the pub and has become its mascot. I asked McMenamins artist Jenny Joyce for her inspiration – why the kilted frogs? Her response: “Re the frogs, there is no logical reason for them. I went through a stage of portraying animals, especially playing music. And I love frogs because they look like humans, ugly humans, true, but likable. So that is where my imagination went, for better or worse. Officially I say that the area around the pub was extremely wet and marshy, hence there would have been lots of frogs there. And the McMenamin kingdom loves music, especially bagpipes, so that is why there are frogs playing music.”

Property #4

Pat’s Corner at the Grand Lodge (Forest Grove, OR)
Named in honor of the McMenamin brothers’ mom, Pat’s Corner is the perfect place to enjoy a pint or a glass of Black Rabbit Red (her preferred potation) while listening to a record from her son Mike’s extensive collection. Pat, whose record collection rivaled her son’s (with one notable exception: a total lack of Grateful Dead albums), fortified both Mike and Brian’s lifelong affinity for music.

Property #5

Olympic Club (Centralia, WA)
While I haven’t ever seen these artifacts personally, I have heard that the urinals at the Oly Club are really something to, well, experience. It is not uncommon to hear male guests effusing – gushing, if you will – over the extraordinariness of these massive Art Deco works of porcelain elegance and wonder. Artist Lyle Hehn’s mural was inspired by both the men’s room impressive facilities as well as beer advertisements typical of the 1910s.

Leave a Comment





8 + fourteen =